Cancer, I Love You


Do you hate your cancer? Do you feel at war with your cancer and think you must fight it at any cost?

The word cancer is one of the most traumatic and devastating words for humankind. It carries so many preconceived notions that it has become taboo to utter it aloud among patients who suffer from it, provoking enormous emotional reactions that are a source of anxiety, fear, anger and a loss of control over one’s own life.

Over the past century, we have been taught to regard and experience cancer as a demon to be destroyed at all costs, but that does not mean we must blindly adhere to this theory and follow it without question?

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Cancer, I Love You
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Cancer, I Love You (Paperback, 148 Pages)
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Reviews

 

KIRKUS REVIEWS

TITLE INFORMATION

CANCER, I LOVE YOU
Alexandre Rushenas
Lulu (164 pp.)
$18.96 paperback, $7.99 e-book
ISBN: 978-1-4834-8734-2; October 1, 2018

BOOK REVIEW

A physician unfolds his theory about curing cancer—not by fighting it with hatred but by correcting it with love.

The “war on cancer” is a familiar phrase to many. But what if the solution involves loving your cancer instead of battling it? This is the heart of Rushenas’ (Le Sang-Graal, 2011) work. Readers are the gods of their cells, and the emotions they radiate “will lead to specific changes at the cellular level, for better or for worse.” Using intense personification, the author explains that projecting hatred to cancer cells (or “orphan cells,” as he compassionately calls them) will cause them to violently retaliate whereas sending them unconditional love can restore harmony. So does this mean people can just think their way out of having cancer? Though the whole book seems to head toward this, in the end Rushenas asserts that traditional cancer treatments (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, etc.) are still the answer. But they should be viewed as lovingly correcting the cancer cells, not resentfully destroying them. Just as near death experiences often give people feelings of sublime love and joy and a desire to change, this cellular near death experience can have a momentous, positive effect on cancer cells. The author notes, however, that emotional visualization (imagining being healthy) must be coupled with corresponding actions (maintaining a beneficial lifestyle) to be effectual. Rushenas efficiently builds his theory one principle at a time, establishing each idea so that it’s fully understandable, and even quite believable, before moving forward. Unfortunately, the price he pays for clarity and persuasion is verbosity: The topic of cancer doesn’t take center stage until Page 91, and readers must plod through extensive autobiographical details and thick metaphysical musings to get there. As a doctor, Rushenas elevates the discussion of human energy to a new level with his scientific observations, especially concerning cell biology. Readers who are open to pseudoscience (like the Emoto water experiments the author refers to) will be most receptive to Rushenas’ theory, though others will likely still be intrigued by this novel perspective.

A well-defended, somewhat scientific argument about the power of positive thinking.

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Cancer, I Love You

Cancer, I Love You